Photographic print for, “I take it all back”. 08 July – 08 June 2014. Curated by Maaike Bakker & Jayne Crawshay-Hall. NIROXprojects, Johannesburg.

Photographic print for, “I take it all back”. 08 July – 08 June 2014. Curated by Maaike Bakker & Jayne Crawshay-Hall. NIROXprojects, Johannesburg.

My trip to Butterfly world with Matty

Sun Ra landed on planet earth May 22, 1914

Cosmic Wonder
Paintings

Review of Golden Age Rising in Art South Africa magazine vol 12 / issue 04/ June 2014 by Tim Leibbrandt

Jackson Mbhazima Hlungwane was born in 1923 at Nkanyani Village, Gazankulu. The son of a Shangaan migrant worker, he had no formal training as an artist and learned to carve from his father who made utility items for his community. He spent time as a migrant worker in Johannesburg but returned home after an industrial accident in which he lost a finger. Hlungwani’s earliest extant sculptures date to the 1960s, although it is the work of the 1980s and later that became widely known and appreciated. 

For many years Hlungwani lived in Mbokhoto, approximately 38 kilometres from Louis Trichardt in northern Limpopo. He selected a particular site on top of a hill, where there were the remains of Iron Age stone structures. He built his home among these ruins and used a few unroofed circular rooms. He named the site New Jerusalem. In the mid 1990s he moved to a more accessible site nearby, which he named New Canaan and which represented not only a physical move but a spiritual shift in his continually developing theology. Hlungwani’s work cannot be understood outside of a local African Christian context. He talks of Christ as his mentor and the source of his creativity. He tells of a desperate time in his life when he was severely ill and wanted to commit suicide but was stopped by a vision of God whose legs he saw in the sky; he heard the voice of Christ who gave him three instructions: Hlungwani should start his own church, make carvings and use them in his teaching.

References

  • Sack, S. (1988). The Neglected Tradition, Johannesburg: Johannesburg Art Gallery

Photos:  Altar to God, New Jerusalem, circa 1984

Studio plants

Studio plants

Spring Equinox 21st September 2013 Tankwa Karoo with Ryan Georgia Christo Adam Andrew Leon and Anton

Maple, Cherry, Electroplated mild steel

284cm x 188 cm x 8mm

ancientart:

The Glavendrup stone ship and the runestone which forms the end of it. Dating from after 900, the Glavendrup stone ship and runestone is located on the island of Funen, Denmark.

The runestone ends in a curse to discourage any tampering with the stone, and is accompanied by a series of standing stones laid out in the shape of a ship. Thought to reflect a belief that the deceased had to make a voyage in the afterlife, this practice goes back to the Iron Age.

Here is a translation of the runestone (DR 209) via the Scandinavian Runic-text Database:

"Ragnhildr placed this stone in memory of Alli the Pale, priest of the sanctuary, honourable þegn of the retinue.

Ragnhildr placed this stone in memory of Alli, priest of the Sølve, honourable þegn of the sanctuary-retinue.

Alli’s sons made this monument in memory of their father, and his wife in memory of her husband. And Sóti carved these runes in memory of his lord. Þórr hallow these runes.

A warlock be he who damages(?) this stone or drags it (to stand) in memory of another.”

Photos taken by Kåre Thor Olsen.

Creative Block April

Creative Block April

Golden Age Rising. Whatiftheworld Gallery. 12th April - 26th May. 2014. See photographs here

Photographs courtesy of Whatifthworld Gallery and Hayden Phipps.  

Exhibition Opening: Saturday 12 April 2014 Time: 11:00 – 14:00 Dress code: WhiteExhibition Closure: Saturday 10 May 2014
Whatiftheworld is pleased to present ‘Golden Age Rising’ by Daniella Mooney.
“One finds here, very rarely in the low lying areas, more frequently as one goes farther up, a clear and extremely hard stone that is spherical and varies in size—a kind of crystal, but a curved crystal, something extraordinary and unknown on the rest of the planet. Among the French of Port-des-Singes, it is called peradam. Ivan Lapse remains puzzled by the formation and root meaning of this word. It may mean, according to him, “harder than diamond,” and it is; or “father of the diamond,” and they say that the diamond is in fact the product of the degeneration of the peradam by a sort of quartering of the circle or, more precisely, cubing of the sphere. Or again, the word may mean “Adam’s stone,” having some secret and profound connection to the original nature of man. The clarity of this stone is so great and its index of refraction so close to that of air that, despite the crystal’s great density, the unaccustomed eye hardly perceives it. But to anyone who seeks it with sincere desire and true need, it reveals itself by its sudden sparkle, like that of dewdrops. The peradam is the only substance, the only material object whose value is recognized by the guides of Mount Analogue. Therefore, it is the standard of all currency, as gold is for us”. (80-81) [1]
[1] Daumal, René. Mount Analogue: A Novel of Symbolically Authentic Non-Euclidean Adventures in Mountain Climbing. Trans. Carol Cosman. Overlook, 2004.
Daniella Mooney (born 1986) is a South African artist who lives and works in Cape Town. She completed her BAFA at the University of Cape Town in 2009. Primarily working in the mediums of sculpture and installation, her work explores the juncture between the sacred and the profane in our experience of the natural world. This is her second solo exhibition at the Whatiftheworld Gallery.

Exhibition Opening: Saturday 12 April 2014 
Time: 11:00 – 14:00 
Dress code: White
Exhibition Closure: Saturday 10 May 2014

Whatiftheworld is pleased to present ‘Golden Age Rising’ by Daniella Mooney.

“One finds here, very rarely in the low lying areas, more frequently as one goes farther up, a clear and extremely hard stone that is spherical and varies in size—a kind of crystal, but a curved crystal, something extraordinary and unknown on the rest of the planet. Among the French of Port-des-Singes, it is called peradam. Ivan Lapse remains puzzled by the formation and root meaning of this word. It may mean, according to him, “harder than diamond,” and it is; or “father of the diamond,” and they say that the diamond is in fact the product of the degeneration of the peradam by a sort of quartering of the circle or, more precisely, cubing of the sphere. Or again, the word may mean “Adam’s stone,” having some secret and profound connection to the original nature of man. The clarity of this stone is so great and its index of refraction so close to that of air that, despite the crystal’s great density, the unaccustomed eye hardly perceives it. But to anyone who seeks it with sincere desire and true need, it reveals itself by its sudden sparkle, like that of dewdrops. The peradam is the only substance, the only material object whose value is recognized by the guides of Mount Analogue. Therefore, it is the standard of all currency, as gold is for us”. (80-81) [1]

[1] Daumal, René. Mount Analogue: A Novel of Symbolically Authentic Non-Euclidean Adventures in Mountain Climbing. Trans. Carol Cosman. Overlook, 2004.

Daniella Mooney (born 1986) is a South African artist who lives and works in Cape Town. She completed her BAFA at the University of Cape Town in 2009. Primarily working in the mediums of sculpture and installation, her work explores the juncture between the sacred and the profane in our experience of the natural world. This is her second solo exhibition at the Whatiftheworld Gallery.

Architect Eero Saarinen in his office with a model for the Gateway ArchThe Gateway Arch is a 192 m high monument in St. Louis Missouri. It’s clad in Stainless Steel and built in the form of a flattened catenary arch. Here is an interior shot of the tram capsule.

The Gateway to the Invisible Must be Visible. Porcelain and Granite. 2013. In collaboration with Yogi de Beer at this year’s GUILD fair for Southern Guild at the V& A in Cape Town. 28th February - 9th March 2014.

The Gateway to the Invisible Must be Visible. Porcelain and Granite. 2013. In collaboration with Yogi de Beer at this year’s GUILD fair for Southern Guild at the V& A in Cape Town. 28th February - 9th March 2014.