Hope and optimism inspite of the present difficulties
Linocut
John Muafangejo
1984

Hope and optimism inspite of the present difficulties

Linocut

John Muafangejo

1984

sebastianborckenhagen:

found doodle, face, 2011

sebastianborckenhagen:

found doodle, face, 2011

Some cacti. Gouache on board.

Some cacti. Gouache on board.

God’s Leg with Eggs
Wood 
1984
Jackson Hlungwane

God’s Leg with Eggs

Wood

1984

Jackson Hlungwane

“'Fish can’t conceal anything, they have no pockets. They are respectful; they don’t shout at you.'”

Jackson Hlungwane
Crag dog!  Waterval Boven, Mpumalanga
Photographic print for, “I take it all back”. 08 July – 08 June 2014. Curated by Maaike Bakker & Jayne Crawshay-Hall. NIROXprojects, Johannesburg.

Photographic print for, “I take it all back”. 08 July – 08 June 2014. Curated by Maaike Bakker & Jayne Crawshay-Hall. NIROXprojects, Johannesburg.

My trip to Butterfly world with Matty

Sun Ra landed on planet earth May 22, 1914

Cosmic Wonder
Paintings

Review of Golden Age Rising in Art South Africa magazine vol 12 / issue 04/ June 2014 by Tim Leibbrandt

Jackson Mbhazima Hlungwane was born in 1923 at Nkanyani Village, Gazankulu. The son of a Shangaan migrant worker, he had no formal training as an artist and learned to carve from his father who made utility items for his community. He spent time as a migrant worker in Johannesburg but returned home after an industrial accident in which he lost a finger. Hlungwani’s earliest extant sculptures date to the 1960s, although it is the work of the 1980s and later that became widely known and appreciated. 

For many years Hlungwani lived in Mbokhoto, approximately 38 kilometres from Louis Trichardt in northern Limpopo. He selected a particular site on top of a hill, where there were the remains of Iron Age stone structures. He built his home among these ruins and used a few unroofed circular rooms. He named the site New Jerusalem. In the mid 1990s he moved to a more accessible site nearby, which he named New Canaan and which represented not only a physical move but a spiritual shift in his continually developing theology. Hlungwani’s work cannot be understood outside of a local African Christian context. He talks of Christ as his mentor and the source of his creativity. He tells of a desperate time in his life when he was severely ill and wanted to commit suicide but was stopped by a vision of God whose legs he saw in the sky; he heard the voice of Christ who gave him three instructions: Hlungwani should start his own church, make carvings and use them in his teaching.

References

  • Sack, S. (1988). The Neglected Tradition, Johannesburg: Johannesburg Art Gallery

Photos:  Altar to God, New Jerusalem, circa 1984

Studio plants

Studio plants

Spring Equinox 21st September 2013 Tankwa Karoo with Ryan Georgia Christo Adam Andrew Leon and Anton

Maple, Cherry, Electroplated mild steel

284cm x 188 cm x 8mm